Scrum, Kanban, XP, Lean, RAD, SAFe®, and so on… We spend a lot of time concentrating on the distinctions across agile frameworks since the list is extensive and diverse. Today, we’ll look at what connects each framework.

Agile frameworks are designed to lead your team toward continuous delivery while developing software. What’s so great about that? Many say better communication, quicker feedback loops, and fewer defects. That’s why we’re here today, looking at seven things all agile frameworks have in common.

1. There is a fixed rate of iteration in every agile framework.

In an agile project, an iteration occurs during which development occurs. These iterations are frequently referred to as sprints.

Iterations vary depending on the project but are always a defined length. These set lengths are crucial because they provide a consistent yardstick for measuring production.

It is critical to remember that teams should not hurry to complete everything just because there is a limited amount of time for every iteration. It is a tool for planning, reviewing procedures, and estimating delivery times.

2. Many agile frameworks are lightweight methodologies that enable self-organized teams to adapt effectively to business objectives.

In an agile project, an iteration occurs during which development occurs. These iterations are frequently referred to as sprints.

Iterations vary depending on the project but are always a defined length. These set lengths are crucial because they provide a consistent yardstick for measuring production.

It is critical to remember that teams should not hurry to complete everything just because there is a limited amount of time for every iteration. It is a tool for planning, reviewing procedures, and estimating delivery times.

3. Agile is all about iterative and incremental development.

Project management is fraught with unknowns, and it is hard to plan for every conceivable outcome. This is why the development process will be divided into tiny, manageable portions regardless of the agile framework used. This is just one example of how agile techniques enable teams to react swiftly and seamlessly, even in the face of last-minute adjustments.

Each increment also indicates a chance for advancement. At the end of each iteration, teams gather to discuss their work to determine what went well, what may be improved, and what should not happen again.

4. Customer value is the goal of all frameworks.

For a long time, innovation and product development were focused only on bringing something distinctive to the market. This was fantastic for bringing new technologies and ideas to life, but more was needed to improve user happiness. Each new concept just introduced a new set of client pain points while disregarding current ones.

Agile frameworks reverse the first-to-market attitude and refocus attention on consumers. In reality, the Agile Manifesto’s first principle and highest objective are to offer customer satisfaction through continuous product delivery.

Because Agile recognizes that the client is at the heart of every business, the client should likewise be at the heart of all development processes. This allows teams to design innovative products that provide actual value to customers.

Evoking Business Agility

5. The goal of all frameworks is continuous improvement.

A self-organized, motivated, and adaptable agile team is excellent. Each of these qualities might be tough to master. Groups must be conscious of representing goals rather than defining traits to prevent fatigue and hastiness.

Agile allows teams to self-assess their work and search for methods to enhance it. It provides more growth opportunities than conventional methods because you work in regular cycles. It also aids in the identification of potential for simplifying operations and eliminating waste.

If you’re in charge of an agile team, remember that you shouldn’t micromanage them. Growth can only occur when you engage and encourage your staff. If you put your faith in your team, they will learn and grow far more than if you try to micromanage their operations.

6. Project goals are aligned with agile frameworks.

Traditional project management frameworks have the disadvantage of frequently needing to be in sync with stakeholders, businesses, and development teams. Stakeholders have a minimal grasp of the development process, business objectives need to be matched with the product goals of stakeholders, and cooperation is complicated. Everyone essentially works in their silo, with the odd message delivered to keep everyone roughly updated on the project’s progress.

Agile frameworks promote participation at all phases of the project. This creates a crucial feedback loop that helps everyone work toward the same goals. It also makes teams feel more comfortable raising any concerns or suggestions, as the stakeholders appear more approachable.

7. Quality is emphasized in agile workflows.

When dealing with agile, you will always discover a firm timeline. Instead, you’ll observe rough timelines and regular, iterative procedures that enable steady, long-term growth. This keeps teams from doing too much work at once, which can lead to crunch times and fatigue.

Choosing a comfortable working speed also aids in the improvement of product quality. Rather than hurrying to complete everything before a deadline, teams may take the time to execute excellent work, test it, and modify it if necessary. You can perform all of this before the product reaches the client, guaranteeing they have the finest product and unique experience from the start.

 
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Agilemania

Businesses transform when they realize that the current ways of working can no longer address the fast-changing market dynamics and rising user expectations. Agilemania, a small group of passionate Lean-Agile-DevOps consultants and trainers, is the most trusted brand for digital transformations in South and South-East Asia.